Flowers 2

Synopsis

The critically acclaimed comedy-drama unfurls for a second series, this time set in the bloom of summer. Will Sharpe’s darkly imaginative, heartfelt and cinematic series sees the return of the well-meaning Deborah (Olivia Colman), her depressive husband Maurice (Julian Barratt), their maladjusted adult twin children Amy (Sophia Di Martino) and Donald (Daniel Rigby) and the rest of this dysfunctional ensemble, including the eternally optimistic Shun (played by Sharpe). It’s a couple of years after the end of series one, and Maurice and Deborah are on a caravan holiday.

What The Flying Colour Company was asked to do

For this second series, The Flying Colour Company (TFCC) was asked to provide the visual effects for one of the key dream sequences. The scene was stylistically shot to give the scene a unique, dreamy quality that would accommodate a vast range of conceptual effects and artwork. The VFX included the enhancement of flames around a ring of fire, adding more flames, embers and smoke as well as interacting colours rising from the flames and reflecting on the different characters as they rise to the heavily textured sky above.

The biggest shot to complete featured a 2D VFX spirit rising from a ring of fire and into the heavy and looming sky above.

How we did it

TFCC worked closely with writer and director Will Sharpe to get a clear idea of his vision for the sequence. The requirements were that it had to be as colourful, vibrant and eccentric as the family in the series and contain various different textures and effects that would be used in a unique way. These included smoke, fire and light rays that coloured and distorted using different techniques and overlay them to the sequence.

TFCC also provided on-set supervision and pre-visualisation to help realise Sharpe’s vision. The shots were then stitched together to create a collage of vibrancy and colour.

TFCC managing director Simon Wilkinson says: “It was really exciting and challenging creating the final shot in the sequence where the family are eccentrically dancing around a ring of fire and a large colourful, swirling spirit emanates from the flames and travels up to the sky, illuminating the clouds with colourful bursts of light.”

All VFX shots were completed using Autodesk Flame, supervised by TFCC’s Dom Thomson. The VFX work was completed by TFCC’s newly recruited senior artist Savneet Nagi.